234 STEM Experiments & Projects, Science Activities & Lessons – Grades K-6

234 STEM Experiments & Projects, Science Activities & Lessons, Grades K-6

STEM is an acronym for Science, Techonology, Engineering and Math. STEM education is an interdisciplinary approach to learning that focuses on these four subjects as they relate to real-world problems and applications. STEM activities and experiments often involve hands-on learning, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills. The goal of STEM education is to prepare students for successful careers in fields related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, and to help students develop the skills and knowledge they need to be informed and engaged citizens in the 21st century. Here are 214 documents and zip downloads giving you lots of STEM and science lessons, activities and experiments for students in grades K-6, followed by an additional 20 STEM and science activities and experiments that primary grade students can do at home or in the classroom. Also check out our other STEM and science learning pages here.

Bestedlessons.org excludes any liability for injury or damage howsoever caused by the use of these documents, is not responsible for the standard of development or safety of any of the products or items used in them, and makes no warranty against errors and omissions in any document or accompanying material.

214 STEM and Science Experiments, Projects, Activities and Lessons

(All files are in pdf format unless otherwise indicated. Zip files contain lesson kits.)

  1. 6 STEM Activities, K-3rd Grade
  2. 7 Lessons on Earth and Space, Grades 4-6.zip
  3. 8 Lessons on Rocks, Soils and Fossils.zip
  4. 12 Design STEM Activities, All Ages
  5. 13 Elementary School Science Experiments
  6. Algebraic Thinking Math Project, Looking Through the Algebraic Lens, G3-5
  7. Animals Over Winter, Grades 2-5.zip
  8. Animals, Including Humans Ourselves, Grade 3.zip
  9. Animals, Including Humans Ourselves, Grades 1-2.zip
  10. Artlab at Home, Frozen Sculptures, All Ages
  11. Baffling Body Fluids
  12. Balloon Astronaut Lesson, Grades 2-8
  13. Balloon C-Strength
  14. Balloon Car Racers (supporting mp4 video)
  15. Balloon Saxophone Activity, All Ages
  16. Balloons and Charles’ Law, Grades 3-5
  17. Battery Testing
  18. Becoming a Designer of Machines, Grades 4-6.zip
  19. Bone Bingo
  20. Bouncing High Activity, All Ages (supporting mp4 video)
  21. Bouncing High
  22. Bread Fossels Activity
  23. Bridges of Konigsberg.zip
  24. Brilliant Bodies.zip
  25. Bubbles Activity, All Ages
  26. Build a Bridge Activity, All Ages (supporting mp4 video)
  27. Build a Storm Drain Activity, Grades 3-8
  28. Build an Aqueduct, All Ages (supporting mp4 video)
  29. Building a Bionic Hand
  30. Building for Birdie Activity, All Ages
  31. Butter Slime Activity, All Ages
  32. Cabbage Inks Activity, Grades 3-8 (supporting mp4 video)
  33. Candle Chemistry (supporting mp4 video)
  34. Chemistry and Laundry, Grades 4-6
  35. Chemistry is Colorful Activity, All Ages (supporting mp4 video)
  36. Chromatography Color Detective Activity, All Ages
  37. Circuit Clowns, Electricity.zip
  38. Classification Activities
  39. Classification of Living Things Activities, Grades 4-6.zip
  40. Clean Science, Grades 4-6
  41. Clever Circuits Activity, Grades 4-6.zip
  42. Codebreaking and Ciphers.zip
  43. Confetti Popper Activity, All Ages
  44. Cooking with the Sun Activity, Grades 3-8
  45. Copter Engineering Activity, K-4th Grade
  46. Cough Syrup Project, Grades 5-6.zip
  47. Coupled Pendulumns
  48. Crystallization, Grades 2-4
  49. Cube Folding
  50. Cup Phone Activity, All Ages
  51. Cupcake Delivery Design Challenge Activity, All Ages
  52. Daylight in a Bottle
  53. Daytime Moon Viewing
  54. Decontamination Algorithm Activity, Grades 3-8
  55. Design and Build a Bee House Lesson.zip
  56. Design and Build a Toy that Moves
  57. Designing and Creating a Sound Generator.zip
  58. Do Plants Need Soil to Grow
  59. Dr Seuss Ooblek Home Experiment
  60. Draft Detectives Activity, All Ages
  61. Dragon Linkages Activity, All Ages
  62. Drinks Cooler
  63. Electricity Activities, Grades 4-6.zip
  64. Electricity, It’s Electric Lessons.zip
  65. Elementary School Math, Bubble Mania (Measurement)
  66. Elementary School Math, Food For Thought (Fractions, Decimals)
  67. Elementary School Math, It Takes Ten (Measurement)
  68. Elementary School Math, Mirror, Mirror (Geometry)
  69. Elementary School Math, Peddling Petals (Patterns)
  70. Elementary School Math, Soak It Up (Number Sense, Computation)
  71. Elementary School Math, Struts n Stuff (Patterns, Relationships)
  72. Elementary School Math, To Half or Half Not (Number Sense, Computation)
  73. Elementary STEM Activities
  74. Energy Red Light Activity, Grades K-4
  75. Engineering for Earthquakes Activity, Grades 3-8 (supporting mp4 video)
  76. Everyday Materials – Let’s Build.zip
  77. Exploring Buoyancy Lesson, Grades 3-8
  78. Exploring Ramp Painting Activity, All Ages
  79. Family STEM Activities with Hotwheels Cars, Grades K-8
  80. Finding Faces
  81. Fireworks in a Jar Activity, All Ages
  82. Fizzy Fun Activity, All Ages
  83. Flipping Coins, Grades 4-6
  84. Fluffy Slime Activity, All Ages
  85. Food and Your Heart
  86. Forces and Air Resistance.zip
  87. Forces and Gravity.zip
  88. Forces and Magnets, Grades 4-6.zip
  89. Forces and Recycling, Grades 4-6.zip
  90. Fruit Lights Activity, Grades 4-6.zip
  91. Fruit Solar System
  92. Funnel Horn Activity, All Ages
  93. Generating Electricity, Grades 4-6.zip
  94. Get in the Game Activity, All Ages
  95. Get Lucky, Is the Lottery Worth It.zip
  96. Giant Bubbles (supporting mp4 video)
  97. Grouping and Classification of Plants, Grades 4-6.zip
  98. Growing Plants In a Variety of Nutrients.zip
  99. Homemade Lava Lamp (supporting mp4 video)
  100. Homemade Parachutes.mp4
  101. How did dinosaurs leave fossils behind
  102. Ice Balloons Activity, All Ages
  103. Ice-Water-Oil
  104. International Space Station Education Kit.zip
  105. Investigate Various Conditions on Plant Growth.zip
  106. Investigation Activities, Grades 3-4
  107. Investigation Activities, K-2nd Grade
  108. Invisible Ink Secret Message Activity, Grades 1-8
  109. Invisible Ink, Grades 3-6
  110. Irrigation Situation Lesson Unit, Grades 3-5
  111. Journal Making Activity, All Ages
  112. Kitchen Chemistry Activities, Grades 3-12
  113. Kitchen Concoctions.zip
  114. Light and Shadow Play Activity, All Ages
  115. Light Crime Lab Investigation Lessons, Grades 4-6.zip
  116. Linkages Activity, Grades 3-8
  117. Liquid Cooling, Grades 3-6
  118. Living Things and Their Habitats, Grades 4-6.zip
  119. M&M Packing
  120. Machines and Engines, Grades 4-6.zip
  121. Magic Squares.zip
  122. Magnetic Fun and Games, Grades 3-4.zip
  123. Make an Animation Activity, Grades 3-4
  124. Making Emergency Kits Activity, Grades 3-8
  125. Making with Microbes Activity, Grades 3-12 (supporting mp4 video)
  126. Marble Painting Activity, All Ages
  127. Marshmallow Catapult Activity, Grades 1-8
  128. Medicines from Microbes, Grades 5-6.zip
  129. Memory Masters Activity (supporting mp4 video)
  130. Metal Noise Maker Activity, All Ages
  131. Micro Evolution – Darwin’s Finches
  132. Micro Evolution in the Context of Habitats and the Environment, Grades 4-6.zip
  133. Mobius Band Math Activity.zip
  134. Mood Boards Activity, All Ages
  135. Mouse Paint Activity, Grades K-4 (supporting mp4 video)
  136. Mud Bricks Activity, All Ages
  137. Mud Mandalas Activity, All Ages
  138. Mud Painting Activity, All Ages
  139. Musical Coat Hangers
  140. Mysterious M&Ms
  141. Nocturnal Animals, Age 5-7.zip
  142. Number Skills, Grade 3-4
  143. Numbers in Nature.zip
  144. Oobleck Activity, All Ages
  145. Our Solar System Activities, K-3rd Grade
  146. Paper Airplane Experiment
  147. Paper Lanterns Activity, All Ages
  148. Periscopes, Grades 4-6.zip
  149. Physics and the Tower of Pisa, Grades 2-4
  150. Pineapples and Enzymes, Grades 2-4
  151. Pipette Play Activity, All Ages
  152. Plant and Animal Cell Tonicity, Grades 5-6
  153. Plant Growth, Grades 1-4
  154. Plants – Roots and Shoots.zip
  155. Plants – Their Parts and Primary Functions.zip
  156. Plarn Activity, All Ages
  157. Playdough Activity, All Ages
  158. Polygon Analysis
  159. Pop Art Activity, All Ages
  160. Practical Work in Primary Science – Biology, Chemistry, Physics
  161. Preschoolers Investigating STEM
  162. Properties and Changes of Materials, Grades 4-6.zip
  163. Properties of Pendulums, Grades 4-6
  164. Property Investigators Activity, Grades 1-4
  165. Racing M&M Colors
  166. Rainbow – Light, Sound and Waves
  167. Rate of Filtration
  168. Rocket Mice Activity, K-2nd Grade (supporting mp4 video)
  169. Roller Coasters Activity, All Ages
  170. Rubber Band Cannons (supporting mp4 video)
  171. Salt Drawing Activity, All Ages
  172. Scribble Machines Activities, Grades 3-8
  173. Seasonal Changes – Wonderful Weather.zip
  174. Seeds and Fruits Education Pack, Grades 4-6.zip
  175. Seeping Stones Activity
  176. Shapes and Patterns
  177. Small or Far Away Activity (supporting mp4 video)
  178. Solve the Fall Activity, All Ages
  179. Sounds Like Science
  180. Spaghetti Towers (supporting mp4 video)
  181. Spring Pollination pack.zip
  182. Starters for Science, Grades 4-6.zip
  183. Starting Number Skills Activities, K-2nd Grade
  184. Static Magic (supporting mp4 video)
  185. Static Spinning Straw
  186. STEM Activity Book, K-3rd Grade
  187. STEM Family Activities Workbook, Pre-K – Kindergarten
  188. STEM Games, Grades 3-4
  189. STEM Learning and Activity Book, Ages 7-11
  190. STEM Storytelling Picture Books to Integrate Mathematics, K-G2
  191. Storm Shield What Living Things Need Lesson, Grades K-4
  192. Sunlight and Space Travel.zip
  193. Sweet Speedway Activity, All Ages
  194. Take Flight Activity, Grades K-4
  195. The Human Body Activity Sheets, K-3rd Grade
  196. The Human Body Game.zip
  197. The Inner Solar System
  198. The Magic of Light, Grades 3-5.zip
  199. The Phenomenon Of Sound Waves Lesson, Grades K-5
  200. The Water Cycle.zip
  201. Trees – Vital Statistics, Describing and Measuring Trees.zip
  202. Tune Booster Activity, Grades 3-8
  203. Turtle Life Cycle.zip
  204. Understanding Density Activity
  205. Using Tools Flubber Activity, All Ages
  206. Water Painting Activity, All Ages
  207. Weaving Activity, All Ages
  208. What Are the Layers of the Earth Science Project, Grades 2-4
  209. What Bugs Are Living Near You, Grades 4-6.zip
  210. What Can Lichens Tell Us about Air Quality, Grades 4-6.zip
  211. What is a Dinosaur
  212. Where Can We Find Asteroids and Comets
  213. Wind Works Activity
  214. Zipline Activity, All Ages
STEM Experiments and Activities - Grades K-6

20 STEM and Science Activities and Experiments

Make a homemade volcano.

To make a homemade volcano, you will need the following materials:

  • A plastic bottle
  • Playdough or clay
  • Baking soda
  • White vinegar
  • Red food coloring (optional)

Here’s how to make a homemade volcano:

  1. Take a large ball of playdough or clay and press it onto the top of the plastic bottle to create the mountain shape of the volcano.
  2. Mix together about 1/2 cup of water, 1/4 cup of white vinegar, and a few drops of red food coloring in a small bowl.
  3. Pour the mixture into the plastic bottle.
  4. Sprinkle about 3 tablespoons of baking soda onto the top of the playdough or clay mountain.
  5. Watch as the vinegar and baking soda react to create a fizzy, erupting volcano!

You can experiment with the amount of baking soda and vinegar to see how it affects the strength of the eruption. You can also try using different types of food coloring to create different lava colors.

Grow crystals.

Growing crystals is a fun and easy STEM learning activity that for either at home or in the classroom. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A jar or glass container
  • A crystal-forming substance (such as salt, sugar, or borax)
  • Water
  • A stirring spoon or stick
  • String or a wooden skewer
  • Food coloring (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Pour about 1 cup of water into the jar or glass container.
  2. Add about 1/2 cup of the crystal-forming substance to the water.
  3. Stir the mixture until the substance has mostly dissolved in the water.
  4. If desired, add a few drops of food coloring to the mixture to give the crystals some color.
  5. Tie the string or wooden skewer to the handle of the spoon or stick and place it in the jar or container so that it hangs down into the mixture.
  6. Place the jar or container in a cool, dry place where it will not be disturbed.
  7. Allow the mixture to sit undisturbed for several days or until crystals have formed on the string or skewer.
  8. Once the crystals have formed, carefully remove the string or skewer from the jar or container and observe the crystals.

You can try growing crystals with different types of crystal-forming substances to see which ones produce the biggest or most colorful crystals. You can also experiment with different colors of food coloring to see how it affects the crystals.

Create a simple circuit.

Creating a simple circuit is a great STEM activity for young people for learning some basics of electricity. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A battery (such as a AA or AAA battery)
  • A light bulb or small motor
  • Electrical wire or conductive wire (such as copper wire or aluminum foil)
  • Electrical tape or alligator clips (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Strip the ends of the electrical wire to expose the metal.
  2. Connect one end of the wire to the positive terminal of the battery (usually marked with a “+” symbol).
  3. Connect the other end of the wire to one end of the light bulb or small motor.
  4. Connect the other end of the light bulb or small motor to the negative terminal of the battery (usually marked with a “-” symbol).
  5. If using electrical tape or alligator clips to connect the wire to the terminals, make sure that the connections are secure.
  6. When the circuit is complete, the light bulb should light up or the motor should start running.

You can experiment with different types of batteries and light bulbs or motors to see how they affect the circuit. You can also try creating more complex circuits by adding additional components such as switches or resistors.

Conduct a paper towel absorbency experiment.

Conducting a paper towel absorbency experiment is a simple and fun STEM experiment. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • Several sheets of paper towels
  • A cup or bowl of water
  • A timer or stopwatch

Instructions:

  1. Place one sheet of paper towel on a flat surface, such as a table or countertop.
  2. Pour a small amount of water onto the paper towel.
  3. Use the timer or stopwatch to measure how long it takes for the water to be completely absorbed into the paper towel.
  4. Repeat the experiment with additional sheets of paper towels, making sure to use the same amount of water each time.
  5. Compare the results for each sheet of paper towel.

You can also try using different types of paper towels, such as regular, thick, or recycled, to see how they compare in terms of absorbency. You can also experiment with different amounts of water to see how it affects the absorbency of the paper towels.

Build a balloon-powered car.

Building a balloon-powered car is a fun and easy STEM activity that will excite youngsters with how physics works. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A cardboard box or plastic container
  • Four plastic bottle caps or small plastic cups
  • Four straws or dowels
  • A balloon
  • Scissors
  • Masking tape or glue

Instructions:

  1. Cut four holes in the cardboard box or plastic container, one near each corner. The holes should be big enough to fit the straws or dowels through.
  2. Insert a straw or dowel through each hole and secure it in place with masking tape or glue.
  3. Attach a plastic bottle cap or small plastic cup to the end of each straw or dowel. These will be the wheels of the car.
  4. Cut a small hole in the front of the cardboard box or plastic container. This will be the “engine” of the car.
  5. Insert the balloon through the hole in the front of the car and stretch it across the inside of the box or container.
  6. Secure the balloon in place with masking tape or glue.
  7. To make the car move, blow up the balloon and quickly release it. The air rushing out of the balloon should propel the car forward.

You can experiment with the size and shape of the cardboard box or plastic container to see how it affects the performance of the car. You can also try using different sizes and shapes of balloon to see how they affect the speed and distance of the car.

Experiment with buoyancy by building a boat.

Experimenting with buoyancy by building a boat is a fun and easy STEM activity. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A cardboard box or plastic container
  • Aluminum foil or plastic wrap
  • Scissors
  • Masking tape or glue
  • Water

Instructions:

  1. Cut the cardboard box or plastic container into a boat shape, with a pointed front and a flat back.
  2. Cover the boat with aluminum foil or plastic wrap, using masking tape or glue to secure it in place.
  3. Fill a sink, tub, or bucket with water and place the boat in the water.
  4. Observe what happens to the boat as you add and remove small objects from it, such as marbles or pennies.
  5. Try to predict whether the boat will sink or float when you add a new object, and then test your prediction.
  6. Record your observations and conclusions about buoyancy and how it affects the boat.

You can also experiment with the shape and size of the boat to see how it affects its buoyancy. You can also try using different materials to cover the boat, such as paper or fabric, to see how they compare in terms of buoyancy.

Make a paper mache planet.

Making a paper mache planet is a fun and creative STEM activity for young students. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A large balloon or beach ball
  • Newspaper or paper towels
  • Flour
  • Water
  • A mixing bowl and spoon
  • Acrylic paint or other decorative materials (optional)

Instructions:

  1. In the mixing bowl, mix together equal parts flour and water to create a paste.
  2. Tear the newspaper or paper towels into small strips.
  3. Dip the strips of paper into the paste and lay them over the balloon or beach ball, covering it completely.
  4. Allow the paper mache to dry completely. This may take a few hours or overnight, depending on the humidity and temperature.
  5. Once the paper mache is dry, you can paint the planet or decorate it with other materials, such as glitter or stickers.
  6. When the paint or decorations are dry, carefully pop the balloon or deflate the beach ball and remove it from the inside of the planet.

You can experiment with different shapes and sizes of balloons or beach balls to create different sizes and shapes of planets. You can also try using different colors of paint or other decorative materials to create different looks for your planet.

Experiment with static electricity.

Build a straw bridge.

Building a straw bridge is a fun and challenging STEM activity where students will demonstrate manual dexterity. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • Straws
  • Masking tape or glue
  • Scissors
  • A ruler or measuring tape

Instructions:

  1. Measure and cut the straws to the desired length for the bridge. You will need two longer straws for the supports and several shorter straws for the decking of the bridge.
  2. Use masking tape or glue to attach the longer straws to a stable surface, such as a table or countertop, to create the supports for the bridge. The distance between the supports should be equal to the desired width of the bridge.
  3. Arrange the shorter straws on top of the longer straws to create the decking of the bridge. The shorter straws should be placed parallel to the longer straws and spaced evenly apart.
  4. Use masking tape or glue to secure the shorter straws in place.
  5. Test the strength of the bridge by gently placing a small object, such as a toy car or block, on the decking and observing if the bridge can support it without collapsing.
  6. Adjust the design of the bridge as needed to increase its strength and stability.

You can experiment with different designs and configurations of straws to see how they affect the strength and stability of the bridge. You can also try using different materials, such as popsicle sticks or cardboard, to see how they compare in terms of bridge-building.

Conduct a density experiment with household items.

Conducting a density experiment with household items is a simple and fun STEM physics learning activity. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A clear glass or plastic jar or container
  • Water
  • Various household objects with different densities (such as a penny, a feather, a paperclip, and a rock)

Instructions:

  1. Fill the jar or container about halfway with water.
  2. Carefully place the household objects, one at a time, into the jar or container.
  3. Observe what happens to each object as you add it to the water. Some objects may float, while others may sink.
  4. Record your observations and try to predict which objects will sink or float before adding them to the water.
  5. You can also try mixing other liquids, such as oil or honey, with the water to see how they affect the densities of the objects.

By comparing the densities of different objects and liquids, you can learn about the properties of matter and how they relate to buoyancy. You can also try using different sizes and shapes of objects to see how they affect their densities.

Make a simple electromagnet.

Making a simple electromagnet is a wonderful STEM activity that students can do at home or in the classroom. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A battery (such as a AA or AAA battery)
  • A piece of insulated wire (such as a telephone wire or speaker wire)
  • A paperclip or small metal object
  • Electrical tape or alligator clips (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Strip the ends of the insulated wire to expose the metal.
  2. Wrap one end of the wire around the positive terminal of the battery (usually marked with a “+” symbol).
  3. Wrap the other end of the wire around the paperclip or small metal object.
  4. If using electrical tape or alligator clips to connect the wire to the battery and metal object, make sure that the connections are secure.
  5. When the circuit is complete, the paperclip or metal object should become magnetized and be able to pick up other small metal objects.

You can experiment with different types of batteries and metal objects to see how they affect the strength of the electromagnet. You can also try creating more complex electromagnets by adding additional components such as switches or resistors.

Experiment with the power of air pressure by creating a can crusher.

Experimenting with the power of air pressure by creating a can crusher is an interesting and easy STEM learning activity. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • An empty aluminum can
  • A stove or hot plate
  • Tongs or oven mitts
  • A bowl of cold water

Instructions:

  1. Place the empty aluminum can on the stove or hot plate and heat it until it is hot to the touch.
  2. Using the tongs or oven mitts, carefully transfer the hot can to the bowl of cold water.
  3. Observe what happens to the can as it cools in the water. The can should crush or collapse as the air inside it contracts due to the change in temperature.
  4. You can also try repeating the experiment with a can that has been filled with air or another gas, such as carbon dioxide, to see how it affects the can’s ability to withstand the change in temperature.

By experimenting with the power of air pressure, you can learn about how gases behave and how they can be affected by changes in temperature and pressure. You can also try using different sizes and shapes of cans to see how they compare in terms of their ability to withstand the change in temperature

Build a simple robot out of household items.

Building a simple robot out of household items is a fun and creative STEM activity for young students. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A cardboard box or plastic container
  • Scissors or a knife
  • Markers or paint (optional)
  • Straws or dowels
  • Rubber bands or string
  • Small household objects, such as bottle caps or paper clips, for decoration

Instructions:

  1. Cut holes or openings in the cardboard box or plastic container to create the robot’s “arms” and “legs.”
  2. Insert the straws or dowels through the holes or openings and secure them in place with rubber bands or string.
  3. Decorate the robot with markers or paint and small household objects to give it a unique appearance.
  4. Use the robot’s “arms” and “legs” to move it around and make it perform simple tasks, such as picking up and moving objects.

You can experiment with different designs and configurations of the robot’s “arms” and “legs” to see how they affect its movement and ability to perform tasks. You can also try using different materials, such as paper or fabric, to see how they affect the robot’s appearance and functionality.

Make a water filter using sand and gravel.

Making a water filter using sand and gravel is a simple and educational STEM activity. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A clear glass or plastic jar or container
  • Gravel
  • Sand
  • Charcoal or activated carbon (optional)
  • A coffee filter or cheesecloth
  • Water

Instructions:

  1. Fill the bottom of the jar or container with a layer of gravel.
  2. Add a layer of sand on top of the gravel.
  3. If desired, add a layer of charcoal or activated carbon on top of the sand. This can help remove impurities and odors from the water.
  4. Cover the top of the jar or container with a coffee filter or cheesecloth to keep the sand and gravel from escaping.
  5. Slowly pour water into the jar or container and observe how it filters through the layers of sand, gravel, and charcoal.
  6. The filtered water should be clear and free of debris.

By experimenting with different layers and combinations of sand, gravel, and charcoal, you can learn about the properties of these materials and how they can be used to filter water. You can also try using different sizes and shapes of sand and gravel to see how they affect the effectiveness of the filter.

Experiment with photosynthesis by growing plants in different colored containers.

Experimenting with photosynthesis by growing plants in different colored containers is a simple and educational STEM activity for learning about plants. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • Several small pots or containers in different colors (such as red, blue, green, and clear)
  • Potting soil
  • Seeds or small plants
  • Water

Instructions:

  1. Fill the pots or containers with potting soil and plant the seeds or small plants according to the instructions on the seed packet or plant label.
  2. Water the plants and place them in a sunny location.
  3. Observe the growth of the plants over time and compare the plants grown in different colored containers.
  4. Record your observations and conclusions about how the color of the container affects the growth of the plants.

By experimenting with different colors of containers, you can learn about how light and color can affect photosynthesis and plant growth. You can also try using different types of plants or seeds to see how they compare in terms of their response to different colors.

Build a sun dial.

Building a sun dial is a fun and educational STEM activity that young students can do at home. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A flat, vertical surface, such as a wall or fence
  • A stick or dowel
  • A protractor or angle finder
  • A pencil or pen
  • A piece of paper
  • A compass

Instructions:

  1. Place the stick or dowel in a sunny location on the flat, vertical surface so that it casts a shadow.
  2. Using the protractor or angle finder, measure the angle of the shadow.
  3. Record the time of day and the angle of the shadow on the piece of paper.
  4. Repeat this process at various times throughout the day, recording the angle of the shadow and the corresponding time for each measurement.
  5. Use the compass to mark the north-south direction on the flat surface.
  6. Connect the points on the paper to create a graph of the shadow angle over time.
  7. Use the graph to determine the times when the sun is at its highest and lowest points in the sky.

By building and using a sun dial, you can learn about the movement of the sun and how it affects the length and angle of shadows. You can also experiment with different locations and times of year to see how they affect the sun’s movement and the corresponding shadow angles.

Conduct a taste test with different types of sugar.

Conducting a taste test with different types of sugar is a simple and educational STEM experiment. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • Several types of sugar, such as granulated sugar, brown sugar, and honey
  • Small cups or bowls
  • Water
  • Spoons or tasting utensils

Instructions:

  1. Place a small amount of each type of sugar in a separate cup or bowl.
  2. Add a small amount of water to each cup or bowl to dissolve the sugar.
  3. Taste the different sugars using the spoons or tasting utensils and record your observations.
  4. Compare the tastes of the different sugars and note any differences in sweetness, texture, and flavor.

By conducting a taste test with different types of sugar, you can learn about the properties of these sweeteners and how they differ in terms of taste and functionality. You can also try using the sugars in different recipes to see how they affect the final product.

Experiment with different methods for cleaning dirty pennies.

Experimenting with different methods for cleaning dirty pennies is an interesting STEM activity. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • Several dirty pennies
  • White vinegar
  • Lemon juice
  • Salt
  • Baking soda
  • Water
  • Small cups or bowls
  • Cotton swabs or paper towels

Instructions:

  1. Place a dirty penny in each of the small cups or bowls.
  2. In one cup or bowl, add a small amount of white vinegar and a pinch of salt. In another cup or bowl, add a small amount of lemon juice and a pinch of salt. In another cup or bowl, add a small amount of baking soda and a small amount of water.
  3. Observe the reactions of the pennies in the different solutions and record your observations.
  4. Use the cotton swabs or paper towels to clean the pennies and compare the effectiveness of the different solutions.

By experimenting with different methods for cleaning dirty pennies, you can learn about the properties of different cleaning agents and how they interact with different types of dirt and grime. You can also try using other types of cleaning agents, such as soap or toothpaste, to see how they compare in terms of their effectiveness.

Create a simple pendulum and experiment with its motion.

Creating a simple pendulum and experimenting with its motion is a fun and educational STEM activity that will teach students about physics. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • A piece of string or yarn
  • A small weight or object, such as a washer or nut
  • Scissors
  • A ruler or measuring tape
  • A pen or pencil
  • A piece of paper

Instructions:

  1. Cut a piece of string or yarn to the desired length.
  2. Tie the small weight or object to one end of the string or yarn.
  3. Tie the other end of the string or yarn to a fixed point, such as a doorknob or a hook.
  4. Using the ruler or measuring tape, measure the length of the string or yarn from the fixed point to the weight or object.
  5. Hold the weight or object steady and release it to start the pendulum swinging.
  6. Observe and record the motion of the pendulum and try to predict its path.
  7. You can also try changing the length of the string or yarn or the mass of the weight or object to see how it affects the motion of the pendulum.

By creating a simple pendulum and experimenting with its motion, you can learn about the properties of pendulum motion and how it is affected by factors such as mass and length. You can also try using different materials, such as a cardboard or paper, to create the pendulum to see how they compare in terms of their motion.

Conduct an experiment to see how different liquids affect plant growth.

Conducting an experiment to see how different liquids affect plant growth is an another interesting STEM activity that young students can do at home. Here’s how to do it:

Materials needed:

  • Several small pots or containers
  • Potting soil
  • Seeds or small plants
  • Water
  • Different liquids, such as milk, juice, and vinegar
  • A measuring cup or spoon
  • A watering can or spray bottle

Instructions:

  1. Fill the pots or containers with potting soil and plant the seeds or small plants according to the instructions on the seed packet or plant label.
  2. Water the plants with water and place them in a sunny location.
  3. Measure out equal amounts of the different liquids and use the watering can or spray bottle to apply them to the plants.
  4. Observe the growth of the plants over time and compare the plants grown with different liquids.
  5. Record your observations and conclusions about how the different liquids affect the growth of the plants.

By conducting this experiment, you can learn about the effects of different substances on plant growth and how plants absorb and use water and other nutrients. You can also try using different types of plants or seeds to see how they compare in terms of their response to the different liquids.

-love learning -your best ed lessons guide, Scott

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *